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Network File Sharing & Offline Files Troubleshooting

This page deals with Network File Sharing and Offline Files problems. You can find other network troubleshooting resources here:

Settings for Client for Microsoft Networks and for File and Print Sharing for Microsoft Networks are linked in Windows XP and in Windows 2000

You cannot separately enable or disable the following dial-up networking features:
  • Client for Microsoft Networks
  • File and Print Sharing for Microsoft Networks
For example, you cannot enable Client for Microsoft Networks and disable File and Print Sharing for Microsoft Networks. This is true if you use Group Policy settings, or if you use the remote access API to change the feature settings.
Some Programs May Be Slow When Accessing Files on a Network Share

Any program that uses files on a network share may seem to run slowly while the program is accessing large files across the network. The program may seem to take longer to start, or may seem to stop responding (hang) as it accesses large files across the network.
A Stop error in Mrxdav.sys occurs, or your computer restarts, when you try to open a file on a network share on a Microsoft Windows XP Professional-based computer

When you try to open a file on a shared network subfolder on a Microsoft Windows XP Professional-based computer by using Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning (WebDAV), you may receive a Stop error in Mrxdav.sys on a blue screen, or your computer may immediately restart.

Data is not completely written to files that are located on a network share after you set the attributes of the files in Windows XP Service Pack 1 (SP1)

On your Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 1 (SP1)-based computer, if you use the WriteFile function to write data to a file that is located on a network share, and then you set the attributes of the file by using the SetFileAttributes function, you notice the following symptoms:
  • Not all data is written to the file. The size of the file that is located on the network share is smaller than you expected.
  • You do not receive an error message, and no error messages are logged to the event log.
  • If you perform a Network Monitor trace of the operation, the size of the file is truncated to the same size that is returned to the CreateAndX request in the Windows XP Server Message Block (SMB) packet.
  • You may not be able to open, to rotate, or to view the file on the network share by using the Microsoft Office Document Imaging program.
Sharing violation error message if you use WDS 2.6.5 to index a network share and if you open a file on the network share from a Windows XP-based computer

When you open a file that resides on a network share, you may receive a sharing violation error message. This issue occurs if the following conditions are true:
  • You used Windows Desktop Search (WDS) version 2.6.5 to index a "My Documents" folder that has been redirected to the network share. You did this from a Microsoft Windows XP-based client computer.
  • You used a second Windows XP-based computer to open a file that resides on the network share.
How To Prevent Network Share Shortcuts from Being Added to My Network Places

When you open a file that is located on a file server share, a shortcut to the server share is automatically added to My Network Places. This article describes how to disable this functionality. When you open a file (or a Microsoft FrontPage web) from a Universal Naming Convention (UNC) share, a shortcut to the share is placed in My Network Places.

To disable this functionality, you must change the local system policy or network policy to prevent servers from being added to My Network Places.
When you use HSM software to manage files on a network, you cannot open a network-shared file that was created on a Windows XP-based computer when you work offline

Consider the following scenario:
  • You use Hierarchical Storage Management (HSM) software to manage files that are used infrequently on a file server. In this case, when a user accesses one of the archived files, the storage manager component in HSM brings the archived file online. Additionally, the archived file is transferred to cheaper media by the storage manager according to the policies that you specify.
  • On a Windows XP-based client computer, you create a shared folder on the file server. You make the shared folder available offline.
  • The shared folder contains files that have the reparse point attribute.
    • Note: The reparse point attribute remains on the files when the files are migrated to offline storage.
  • The shared folder has been synchronized with the file server, and the archived files have been downloaded to the offline cache of the client computers on the network.
  • On a Windows XP-based client computer on the network, you try to open a document on the network share by using a Microsoft Office application when you work offline.
In this scenario, you cannot open the document as expected. Additionally, you may receive an error message. For example, in Microsoft Word, you may receive an error message that resembles the following:

An error occurred on opening the file.

In Microsoft Excel, you may receive an error message that resembles the following:

Unable to Access to file_name
Cannot Map a Network Drive Under Different User Credentials

If you use the Map Network Drive Wizard to connect to a network share by using different user credentials and you use the browse functionality to locate the network share, you may receive the following error message:

The network folder specified is currently mapped using a different user name and password. To connect using a different user name and password, first disconnect any existing mappings to this network share.

You receive this error message even though you are not aware of making a different connection.
 
Files saved to a mapped network share from Windows XP are corrupted

When you try to save a file from a Microsoft Windows XP-based computer to a network share on a Windows-based server, the saved file may be corrupted. Typically, the saved file contains zeros in the end of the file instead of the expected data.
How To Share Windows Folders by Using Server for NFS

UNIX uses the Network File System (NFS) protocol to share files and folders on the network. You can use the Server for NFS component in Windows Services for UNIX to share Windows file system resources to UNIX and Linux clients by using NFS, which includes full support for NFS v3. You can use Server for NFS to make interoperability and migration in a mixed environment easier. If you are using Windows, you can use either Windows Explorer or the Windows Nfsshare.exe command-line utility to share files to UNIX clients.

You can use Server for NFS to make Windows resources available to UNIX and Linux clients by using the NFS protocol. You can use either Windows Explorer or the Nfsshare.exe command line utility to share the folder.
No User-Level Access Control Is Available for My Network Places or for Sharing Folders in My Computer

After you upgrade a computer from Microsoft Windows Millennium Edition (Me) or Microsoft Windows 98 to Windows XP Home Edition, you do not find any option to set a password for access to data on the computer in My Network Places or on the Sharing tab in the folder Properties dialog box in My Computer. This password option is available in Windows Me and Windows 98.
You see message 3019 in the System Event log when you map a network drive or connect to a network share by using a UNC path name in Windows XP Service Pack 2

n a Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 2 (SP2)-based computer, when you map a network drive or connect to a network share by using a UNC path name such as \\server_name\share_name, the following event log warning entry may be written in the System Event log:

Event ID: 3019
Source: MRxSmb
Type: Warning
Description:
The redirector failed to determine the connection type.


This problem can occur when NetBIOS over TCP/IP (NetBT) tries to query a loopback adaptor as a destination device to determine network speed. The loopback adaptor does not handle speed negotiation. Therefore, the loopback adaptor cannot negotiate network speed.

You receive an "Access denied" or a "Sharing violation" error message when you try to delete files on the network by using Windows Explorer in Windows XP SP1

After you install Service Pack 1 (SP1) on your Microsoft Windows XP-based computer, you may receive one of the following error messages when you try to delete files that you have selected over the network in Windows Explorer:

Access denied

Sharing violation

If you delete or add folders in a network-shared folder, Windows Explorer does not show the change in Windows XP

When you use Windows Explorer to delete or to add a folder in a shared network folder in Microsoft Windows XP, Windows Explorer is not updated automatically to show the changes. You must press F5 to update Windows Explorer.
Slow network performance when you open a file that is located in a shared folder on a remote network computer

When you use Windows Explorer to connect to a shared folder on a remote computer on your network, and you double-click a file in that shared folder to open it, it may take a longer time than expected to open the file. For example, you may experience this issue when you open a Microsoft Office document over a slow connection, such as a 64-kilobits-per-second (kbps) Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) connection on a wide area network (WAN).
You Cannot Make Network Share Content Available Offline in Windows Explorer

When you right-click an item on a network share in Windows Explorer to display the shortcut menu, the Make available offline command may not be present.
Error message when you try to share a folder on a Windows XP-based computer: "As a security measure, Windows has disabled remote access to this computer"

When you try to share a folder on a Microsoft Windows XP-based computer, you receive the following error message:

As a security measure, Windows has disabled remote access to this computer. However you can enable remote access and safely share files by running the Network Setup Wizard.

Additionally, you may receive this same error message when you try to run the Network Setup Wizard.
"Network Path not Found" Error Message When You Connect to Non-Client-Side Caching Managed Shares

If one file server contains both shares that are made available offline (Client-Side Caching managed) and shares that are not made available offline (not Client-Side Caching managed), you may not be able to connect to the non-Client-Side Caching-managed shares before you re-synchronize the Client-Side Caching-managed shares. When you cannot connect to the share, you receive a "Network Path not found" error message.
An "ERROR_ACCESS_DENIED" error occurs when you try to write to a file that is in a network shared folder

A call to the WriteFile function may not succeed. You experience this symptom when the following conditions are true:
  • You are using a client computer that is running Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 1 (SP1).
  • You use the WriteFile function to try to write to a file that is in a network shared folder.
  • The shared folder is on a server computer that is running either Microsoft Windows 2000 or Microsoft Windows Server 2003.
Additionally, you may receive the following error message:

ERROR_ACCESS_DENIED
Program opens a file as read-only or returns a sharing violation or "access denied" message when opening from or saving to a network folder

If you open a network folder in Windows Explorer and then try to open a file from or save a file to that folder, the associated program may report a sharing violation, return an "access denied" message, or open the document as read-only. Typically, this problem occurs when you open a network folder and then double-click to open a Microsoft Word or Microsoft Excel file. The document opens as read-only.
An OpenAFS share cannot be accessed on a Windows XP-based client that is not using the network

An OpenAFS share cannot be accessed on a Microsoft Windows XP-based client if the client is not using the network to access the share. A Network Monitor trace shows the following error code:

STATUS_DOWNGRADE_DETECTED

Additionally, events in the Security logs may show that Kerberos tickets for the Common Internet File System (CIFS) server cannot be obtained.
A scheduled task that is running under a specific account cannot access a shared network resource in Windows XP

On a Microsoft Windows XP-based computer, a scheduled task that is running under a specific account cannot access a shared network resource. This symptom occurs when the following conditions are true:
  • The specific account has an interactive session that was opened by using a smart card. Specifically, the user uses a personal identification number (PIN) instead of a password to open the interactive session.
  • The Kerberos ticket (TGT) has expired.
After the scheduled task cannot access the shared network resource, an event that is similar to the following may be logged in the Application event log:

Event Type: Warning
Event Source: LSASRV
Event Category: SPNEGO (Negotiator)
Event ID: 40960
Date: 5/19/2004
Time: 9:25:51 AM
User: N/A
Computer: DEVXPVMWARE
Description:
The Security System detected an attempted downgrade attack for server cifs/secur012.SECURDOM2.com. The failure code from authentication protocol Kerberos was "No PIN was presented to the smart card (0xc0000382)".

You receive an "Access is denied" error message when you try to access shares on a Windows XP Home Edition-based computer that is connected to a network

When you try to map drives or access files on shares on a Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition-based computer that is connected to a network, you receive an "Access is denied" error message.
You cannot access shared files and folders or browse computers in the workgroup with Windows XP

On Windows XP-based computers that are configured as members of a workgroup in a peer-to-peer network environment, you may experience one or more of the following symptoms:
  • You cannot access shared folders or files.
  • You cannot locate other computers in the workgroup.
  • You receive the following error message when you double-click the workgroup in My Network Places:
Workgroup Name is not accessible. You may not have permission to use this network resource.

This behaviour may occur if all the following conditions are true:
  • NetBIOS over TCP/IP is not turned on (enabled) on one or more computers in the workgroup.
  • The Computer Browser service is not started or is turned off on one or more computers in the workgroup.
  • This behaviour may also occur if File and Print Sharing for Microsoft Networks is not installed or is blocked by Windows Firewall.
Internet firewalls can prevent browsing and file sharing

Explains that turning on a firewall may keep you from searching or sharing files with other computers on a home network.
How to disable simplified sharing and set permissions on a shared folder in Windows XP

By default, simple file sharing is enabled on a Microsoft Windows XP-based computer if the computer is not a member of a domain. With simple file sharing, you can share folders with everyone on your workgroup or network and make folders in your user profile private. However, if simple file sharing is enabled, you cannot prevent specific users and groups from accessing your shared folders. If you turn off simple file sharing, you can permit specific users and groups to access a shared folder. Those users must be logged on with the credentials of user accounts that you have granted access to your shared folder.

If simple file sharing is enabled, you see the simple file sharing user interface appears instead of the Security and Sharing tabs. By default, this new user interface is implemented in Windows XP Home Edition and in Microsoft Windows XP Professional if you are working in a workgroup. If you turn off simple file sharing, the classic Security and Sharing tabs appear, and you can specify which users and groups have access to shared folders on your computer.

Note: To allow for specific users to access the share folder after the simple file sharing is disabled, you should configure both the NTFS permissions on the Security tab and the share permission on the Sharing tab of the share folder. NTFS permissions can only be set on a partition using NTFS file system. If you remove the Every Group from the NTFS permission, you cannot access the share folder over the network.
Default Permissions for Shared Folders Is Read-Only Access for Everyone

By default in Windows XP Service Pack 1 (SP1), if you click the Sharing tab of the Properties dialog box for the folder, and then share the folder for other users to access over the network, the folder has permissions that give everyone read-only access. In versions of Windows XP that are earlier than SP1, if you share folders by using the Sharing tab of the Properties dialog box, the folder has default permissions that gives everyone full control.

Note: This behaviour is not true for folders that you share by using the New File Share Wizard and the Net.exe command. These folders continue to have default permissions that give everyone full control.
You may receive the "The local device name is already in use" error message when you try to restore a network mapping connection to a shared network folder on a Windows XP-based client

When you try to access a network drive on a Microsoft Windows XP-based client that is mapped to a shared network folder of a file server in a domain, you may receive the following error message:

The local device name is already in use

Note This issue may also occur on Microsoft Windows Server 2003-based clients.
Browsing the My Documents folder on a network share with Windows Explorer from a Windows XP-based computer takes longer than expected

When you open your My Documents folder in Windows Explorer, Windows Explorer may take longer than expected to display the contents of the My Documents folder.
Share-level mapped network drives are not connected after you restart your computer

When you restart your computer that is running Microsoft Windows XP Professional, some of the earlier mapped network drives may be disconnected. A red "X" appears for the network drives that are disconnected.

This behaviour may occur if all the following conditions are true:
  • You have a computer that is running Microsoft Windows 95 or Microsoft Windows 98 as a network file server in Share-level access control in a peer-to-peer network. By using share-level access control, you can supply a password for each shared resource.
  • You have multiple shared folders on the computer that is running Windows 95 or Windows 98, and each shared folder has a different password.
  • From the computer running Windows XP Professional, you connect to more than one password-protected folder that is shared on the Windows 95-based or Windows 98-based computer.
  • You select the Remember my password check box for each folder that is shared on the Windows 95-based or Windows 98-based computer.
How To Create a Shortcut to a Network Location in Windows XP

This article is a step-by-step guide to creating a connection to a shared resource on another computer.
How to connect to network resources in Windows XP without mapping a drive or a port

This article describes how to use Universal Naming Convention (UNC) names with My Network Places to connect to network resources without mapping a drive or port.
How To Disable Automatic Search for Network Printers and Folders in Windows XP

This step-by-step article describes how to disable the automatic search function for network printers and folders in Microsoft Windows XP.

By default, Windows XP monitors shared resources on the network to make it easier to connect to a shared resource. This feature, which is new in Windows XP, is implemented by periodically scanning the computers on the network. During the scan, Windows XP identifies any newly-shared resources, such as a printer that has just gone online as a shared printer, or a folder that has just been shared.

When Windows XP finds a newly-shared resource, it adds an icon for the resource to My Network Places, and, if the new resource is a printer, also in your Printers and Faxes folder. This is a convenient way for you to keep up to date on the shared resources that are available on the network, and it does not add a great deal of overhead to your Windows XP computer's work load.

However, the apparent convenience of this new feature may not be desirable if you cannot use the information that is gained from the automatic scan for network resources.
How to configure file sharing in Windows XP

Discusses how to share files among both local and remote users.
How To Set Up Server for NFS

UNIX uses Network File System (NFS) to share files and folders on the network. Windows Services for UNIX 3.0 includes the Server for NFS component that creates a full NFS version 3 server, which you can use to provide file services to UNIX and Linux client computers from Windows computers. If you are using Windows, you can share files to UNIX clients by using either Windows Explorer or the Windows Nfsshare.exe command line utility.
How to troubleshoot home networking in Windows XP

This article explains how to troubleshoot problems you may experience with Microsoft Windows XP Home Networking. Learn how to perform the following troubleshooting tasks: How to use the Home and Small Office Networking Troubleshooter; How to determine your network structure (topology); How to troubleshoot either basic connectivity or file and printer sharing issues.
How to connect and disconnect a network drive in Windows XP

To connect and disconnect a network drive in Microsoft Windows XP, you can use one of the four methods that are described in this article. You can map a drive letter to any shared resource on a network. When you do so, you can quickly and easily access the resource by using either the Windows XP user interface or a command prompt. For each mapped drive, an icon appears in My Computer and a listing appears in the left pane of Windows Explorer.
How to establish a common Favorites folder

Note: This article refers to Windows NT, however it is applicable to Windows XP.

This article describes how to establish and maintain a common Favorites folder for all users who are using Windows NT in a Windows NT networking environment (that is, a Windows NT domain or workgroup).
How to Set Security in Windows XP Professional That Is Installed in a Workgroup

This article describes how to set permissions in a workgroup after an upgrade from Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional to Microsoft Windows XP Professional.
How to optimize Office Access and Jet database engine network performance with Windows 2000-based and Windows XP-based clients

When you run a Microsoft Jet database engine-based program, such as Microsoft Office Access, on your Microsoft Windows 2000-based or Microsoft Windows XP-based computer, the program may appear slower and less responsive than you expect. This article contains information about how you can optimize network performance for Windows 2000-based and Windows XP-based computers. Doing this can make Office Access and Jet database engine-based programs more responsive.
How To Use the Client for NFS to Set the NFS Permissions for a File or Folder

This step-by-step article describes how to use the Client for Network File System (NFS) to set the NFS permissions for a file or folder. NFS uses inherently different permissions compared to the NTFS file system's Directory Access Control Lists (DACLs). However, you can use Services for UNIX's Client for NFS to change the permissions attributes of the underlying file or folder by using the standard UNIX and NFS permissions attributes.
How to use the Network Monitor Capture Utility (Netcap.exe) to capture network traffic information

This article describes how to use the Network Monitor Capture Utility (Netcap.exe) to capture network traffic information on source and destination computers. You can use this information to troubleshoot performance issues that you may experience during the file copy process.
My Computer and Windows Explorer unexpectedly quit when you try to open My Network Places or Shared Documents in Windows XP and Windows Server 2003

When you open My Computer or Windows Explorer and then try to open the My Network Places folder or the Shared Documents folder, My Computer or Windows Explorer may unexpectedly quit. A Windows Error Reporting access violation error message may appear.
Disconnected Mapped Drive to a Shared Folder on a NetWare Server Is Not Displayed in Windows Explorer or My Computer

In Windows XP Professional, if you map a drive to a shared folder on a server that is running Novell NetWare and then disconnect from the mapped network drive, the mapped network drive may be missing from Windows Explorer and from My Computer. The icon that represents the disconnected mapped network drive is not displayed as expected with a red X. As a result, you cannot click the icon in Windows Explorer or in My Computer to reconnect to the NetWare network drive.
Windows XP stops responding when you connect to a shared folder

When you try to use Microsoft Internet Explorer on a Microsoft Windows XP-based computer to connect over your LAN to a shared folder, you may not connect to the network share, and your computer may appear to have stopped responding. However, if you wait for a long time (more than five minutes), the request may time out, and then your computer respond again or you receive a "Page not available"
Drive Letters of Mapped Network Drives Are Missing in Windows Explorer

You may find that mapped drive letters to shared network folders are missing in Windows Explorer when you use the Work online without synchronizing changes over a virtual private network (VPN) connection.
Shared file access is delayed if the file is open on another computer

If you try to open a file on a computer that is running Windows NT over the network and the file is open on another client computer that has sharing restrictions, there is a delay of approximately one second before the sharing violation error message is returned. If the client application is accessing a number of files on the server, this delay may become significant. These symptoms can be easily seen with any multi-user, file-based application, such as the Jet database engine that has shared database files.
Shared folder name does not appear on mapped network drive in Windows Explorer

When you use your Microsoft Windows XP-based computer on a local area network (LAN), and you map a network drive to a shared network folder that is located on a Windows 2000 Server-based server, you may experience the following symptoms:
  • The name of the shared folder does not appear next to the icon of the newly mapped network drive in the Windows Explorer folder tree. If you click F5 to update the screen, or if you click Refresh on the View menu, it does not resolve this behaviour.
  • The properties of the mapped drive indicate that the file system is Read Access Withdrawn (RAW).
  • If you try to copy a file that has a long file name, you receive a message that the file system on the server does not support long file names, contrary to expectation.
Files on network shares open slowly, open as read-only, or you receive an error message

You may experience any one of the following symptoms:
  • When you copy a file over a network in Microsoft Windows XP, if the source file is located on a Microsoft Windows 2000-based network share, you may receive either of the following error messages
    • File or network path no longer exists.
    • No network provider accepted the given network path.
  • When you try to open a file from a network share, the file may take longer than expected to open.
  • You may receive various error messages or experience other issues when you use a program that opens and closes files or that creates temporary files on the server if the Windows 2000-based server has Server Message Block (SMB) signing turned on.
  • A file that you opened over the network is opened as read-only, or a sharing violation occurs and you must save the file locally to make changes.
This issue may occur even if your permissions are set to Full Control for both the share and the volume that uses the NTFS file system, and no other user has the file open. In this case, you may receive one of the following error messages:

File in use: Filename is locked for editing by username. Click 'Notify' to open a read-only copy of the document and receive notification when the document is no longer in use.

This command is not available because the document is locked for editing.

The document Filename is locked for editing by another user. To open a read-only copy of his document, click...

File is locked for editing, do you want to open a read-only version of the file.

Cannot open Filename on network share. Make sure a disk is in the drive you specified.

Access is denied. The file may be in use by another application.
  • When you open files, programs such as Microsoft Excel or Microsoft PowerPoint may open two files successfully but display a "Read-Only" error message when you open a third file.
  • When you open or when you close files, network programs that rely on heavy network file input/output (I/O) may seem to stop responding, or delays may occur.
  • You may experience issues when Windows XP applies group policies or runs logon scripts.
  • You can save a Microsoft Office file by using the same file name only after you have the file open for at least 30 minutes.
  • You may also receive other error messages, depending on the program that you are using. For example, you may receive error messages that indicate that a file is already in use or that a file can be opened only as read-only.
Browse List Issues on Servers and Clients Include Error Messages About Event ID 8032 and Inability to Browse

Under the following conditions, you may experience one or more of the following symptoms:

When you double-click My Network Places in Windows Explorer, an incomplete browse list is displayed.

Computers that do not have file and printer sharing turned on do not appear in the browse list.

If a Windows-based domain controller does not have file and printer sharing turned on, Windows-based computers that try to use the browse list display the following information about Event ID 8032:

The browser service has failed to retrieve the backup list too many times on transport \Device\NetBT_Tcpip_{XXXXXXX-9F03-42B2-AB84-12EEEFD572E9}. The backup browser is stopping.

A Windows-based client user who is trying to browse My Network Places receives the following information about Event ID 8032:

Event Type: Error
Event Source: Browser
Event Category: None
Event ID: 8032
Date: 16-Feb-2000
Time: 10:22:31
User: N/A
Computer: Client
Description: The browser service has failed to retrieve the backup list too many times on transport \Device\NetBT_Tcpip_{XXXXXXX-9F03-42B2-AB84-12EEEFD572E9}. The backup browser is stopping.
Data: 0000: 0000007a


On the Windows-based domain controller that does not have file and printer sharing turned on, the following information appears:

Event Type: Error
Event Source: Server
Event Category: None
Event ID: 2504
Date: 16-Feb-2000
Time: 11:59:22
User: N/A
Computer: DC
Description: The server could not bind to the transport \Device\NetBT_Tcpip_{XXXXXXX-F096-4E5C-A847-F8F095C45053}.
Data: 0000: aa 05 00 00

Event Type: Error
Event Source: Server
Event Category: None
Event ID: 2505
Date: 16-Feb-2000
Time: 11:59:31
User: N/A
Computer: DC
Description: The server could not bind to the transport \Device\NetbiosSmb because another computer on the network has the same name. The server could not start.
Data: 0000: 34 00 00 00 4...

Cannot Connect to a Network Resource After You Change the Properties of a Network Connection

If you open the properties of a network interface connection and then click to clear a check box (such as the Network Monitor Driver or the File and Printer Sharing check box) and then click to select the same check box, the change may appear to work as expected after you click OK. However, you may not be able to connect to a network resource.
Windows File Protection Cannot Restore Files from a Mapped Network Drive

Windows File Protection (WFP) cannot restore files from the installation point that is specified in the SourcePath registry value if the value specifies a mapped network drive. For example, if you map drive X to \\server\share for the installation files and you then install Windows XP from drive X, WFP cannot restore files from drive X.
How to create and delete hidden or administrative shares on client computers

This step-by-step article describes how to create and delete hidden or administrative shares on Microsoft Windows XP Professional-based, Windows 2000 Professional-based, and Windows NT 4.0 Workstation-based computers.
Cannot access shares or printers across the LAN from Windows XP

While you are using a computer that has one of the operating systems that are listed in the "Applies To" section installed, you may experience either of the following symptoms:

When you try to connect to a network share, you may receive the following error message:

No network provider accepted the given network path.

You may also receive the following error message:

Workstation service terminated with service-specific error 2250
Support for DFS-based shares for Offline Files

Placing offline files on a Distributed File System (DFS) path that is accessed by Windows 2000-based clients is not supported because Windows 2000-based clients cannot maintain the correct path for mapped or Universal Naming Convention (UNC) network paths.
ToolTips do not display complete information about files that are located on a network share

When you move your mouse pointer over a file that is located on a network share, the information that is displayed in the ToolTip may not be complete.
Windows XP Media Center Edition 2005 stops responding when you try to play a music file

When you try to play a music file that is not available, Microsoft Windows XP Media Center Edition 2005 stops responding (hangs). Media Center never indicates that it is waiting for the file to become available. For example, you do not see an hourglass mouse pointer that indicates that Media Center is waiting.

This problem may occur if the following conditions are true:
  • You try to open a music file by using a recent music link in the My Music component of Media Center.
  • The music file is on a network share that is not available.

   "To work around this problem, wait"

 

File Takes an Unexpectedly Long Time to Open Through Server Message Block (SMB) Protocol

When you try to open a file through a network share by using the Server Message Block (SMB) protocol, the file may take an unexpectedly long time to open.
"An Invalid Operation Was Attempted on an Active Network Connection" Error Message Occurs If You Try to Browse the Network

f you use a Windows 2000 Professional-based or a Windows XP Professional-based client computer to browse the network, you may receive the following error message, where Domain is the name of your domain:

Domain is not accessible. You might not have permission to use this network resource. Contact the administrator of this server to find out if you have access permissions.

An invalid operation was attempted on an active network connection.


If you remove the client computer from the domain, and then add it to a workgroup that has the same name as the domain, you may no longer experience this behaviour. If you turn off the Trend Micro antivirus service on the server, you may no longer experience this behaviour.
You can still access shares from a Windows XP-based client computer after the logon hours expire

After you enable the Network security: Force logoff when logon hours expire policy on a Microsoft Windows Server 2003-based domain controller, the policy does not work as expected. You may notice that you still can access shares from a Microsoft Windows XP-based client computer after the logon hours expire.
Windows XP Explorer Pane flickers on mapped network drives

When you view local drives or mapped network drives in Windows Explorer on a Windows XP-based installation, the left pane (folder tree) or tree view may flicker or constantly refresh the whole directory structure with speeds varying from every few seconds to every few minutes.

Microsoft Windows-based servers continue to communicate file system changes to Windows XP-based clients. This may cause extra traffic over a wide area network (WAN).
Error Messages When You Open or Copy Network Files on Windows XP SP1 Clients That Require SMB Signing

Client computers that are running Windows XP Service Pack 1 (SP1) and that are configured to require Server Message Block (SMB) signing may drop SMB signing and may have problems communicating over your network. For example, you may experience any of the following symptoms:
  • When you open a Microsoft Office file, it is opened as read-only. You must save the file locally to make changes.
  • You cannot copy files over the network, and network paths are not accepted by any network provider. For example, you may receive the following error message when you try to connect to an SMB share:
    • The file or the network path no longer exists.
  •  You receive the following error message when you try to open a file on a network share:
    • Cannot open the file on network share. Make sure a disk is in the drive you specified.
File shares on iSCSI devices may not be re-created when you restart the computer

You use the Microsoft iSCSI Initiator service to connect to an Internet SCSI (iSCSI) disk device. The file shares that you create for folders that are located on your iSCSI device may not be re-created when you restart the computer that the shares are created on.
The Computer Browser service does not start and event ID 7024 is logged when you restart your Windows XP Service Pack 2-based computer

After you install Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 2 (SP2), the Computer Browser service does not start when you restart your computer.

This problem occurs because Windows XP SP2 installs Windows Firewall. Windows Firewall may block the ports that are used for file and printer sharing. If these ports are blocked, the Computer Browser service cannot start.
Update to increase the performance of the network redirector

When you access files over a network, you may sometimes notice a small delay.
A program may run very slowly if the network connection to your home folder is slow in Windows Server 2003 or in Windows XP

When you start a program in Microsoft Windows Server 2003 or in Microsoft Windows XP, the program may run very slowly if the following conditions are true:
  • You start a program that does not have a Start in property.
  • The network connection to the mapped network share that contains your home folder is slow.
Additionally, when you log on to the computer, the logon process may be slower than expected if the following conditions are true:
  • The client computer must look for system DLL files in your home folder.
  • The network connection to the mapped network share that contains your home folder is slow.
How to prevent members of the Power Users group from creating network shares on Windows 2000 or later Windows operating systems

This article describes the supported method to prevent members of the Power Users group from creating or managing network shares.
You experience significant delays when you use network shortcuts on a computer that is running Windows XP SP2

When you use network shortcuts to try to browse the contents of a folder on a remote computer, you experience significant delays on a computer that is running Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 2 (SP2).

This problem occurs when the following conditions are true:
  • You click a shortcut in the folders pane in Windows Explorer that contains a Universal Naming Convention (UNC) name.

  • The UNC name references the folder that you want to browse.
  • You are connected to the remote computer over a slow network link.
Additionally, you may experience a delay in program responses when you use the Open, Save, or Save As commands to access a file that is stored on another computer on the network. This performance problem occurs if a UNC name references the file. This delay may be from 10 seconds through one minute. In some cases, Windows Explorer stops responding.
You experience a delay when you use your Windows XP computer to log on to a domain or to connect to a network resource

This article describes a problem where you experience long delays when you log on to the domain and when you open network shares. There are a variety of possible causes. These causes include problems with the WebClient service, problems with proxy settings, and problems with the server configuration.

One easy test that you can use is to turn off the client computer's WebClient service or the server's service that is listening to Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) port 80. If either of these workarounds resolves the problem, there are ways that you can re-enable these services and reduce the delay. Update to the latest service pack for Windows XP, bypass the proxy server for local servers, change the order of network providers so WebClient is the last provider, install any updates to the WebClient service, and then make adjustments to your Internet Explorer configuration.
You experience slow file server performance and delays occur when you work with files that are located on a file server

You may experience one or more of the following symptoms when you work with files over the network:
  • A Windows-based file server that is configured as a file and print server stops responding and file and print server functionality temporarily stops.
  • You experience an unexpectedly long delay when you open, save, close, delete, or print files that are located on a shared resource.
  • You experience a temporary decrease in performance when you use a program over the network. Performance typically slows down for approximately 40 to 45 seconds. However, some delays may last up to 5 minutes.
  • You experience a delay when you perform file copy or backup operations.
  • Windows Explorer stops responding when you connect to a shared resource or you see a red X on the connected network drive in Windows Explorer.
  • When you log on to the file server, after you type your name and password in the Log On to Windows dialog box, a blank screen appears. The desktop does not appear.
  • A program that uses remote procedure call (RPC) or uses named pipes to connect to a file server stops responding.
  • The server temporarily stops responding and one or more event ID messages similar to the following messages appear in the System log on the file server:
Event ID: 2022
Source: Srv
Type: Error
Description:
Server was unable to find a free connection <number> times in the last <number> seconds.

Event ID: 2021
Source: Srv
Type: Error
Description:
Server was unable to create a work item <number> times in the last <number> seconds.

Event ID: 2020
Source: Srv
Type: Error
Description:
The server was unable to allocate from the system paged pool because the pool was empty.

Event ID: 2019
Source: Srv
Type: Error
Description:
The server was unable to allocate from the system nonpaged pool because the pool was empty.

Event ID: 2510
Source: Server
Event Type: Error
Description:
The server service was unable to map error code 1722.
1722 = RPC_S_SERVER_UNAVAILABLE = RPC Service is unavailable.


Additionally, the following event appears in the System log on the client computer:

Event ID: 3013
Event Type: Error
Event Source: MrxSmb / Rdr
Description:
The redirector has timed out a request to ComputerName.
  • You receive an error message similar to one of the following messages when you try to connect to a shared resource:
Error message 1
System error 53. The network path was not found.

Error message 2
System error 64. The specified network name is no longer available.
  • You are intermittently disconnected from network resources, and you cannot reconnect to the network resources on the file server. However, you can ping the server, and you can use a Terminal Services session to connect to the server.
  • If multiple users try to access Microsoft Office documents on the server, the File is locked for editing dialog box does not always appear when the second user opens the file.
  • A network trace indicates a 30 to 40 second delay between an SMB Service client command and a response from the file server.
  • When you try to open an Access 2.0 database file (.mdb file) in Microsoft Access 97, in Microsoft Access 2000, or in Microsoft Access 2002, you may receive an error message that is similar to the following:
    • Disk or network error.
  • When you try to open a Microsoft Word file, you may receive the following error message:
    • Word failed reading from this file file_name. Please restore the network connection or replace the floppy disk and retry.
Additionally, the following event may be logged in the System log on the client computer:

Type: Warning
Source: MrxSmb
Event ID: 50
Description: {Lost Delayed-Write-Data} The system was attempting to transfer file data from buffers to \Device\LanmanRedirector. The write operation failed, and only some of the data may have been written to the file.

Cannot Delete Shortcut on a Network Share: "It Is Being Used by Another Person or Program"

When you try to delete a shortcut that you access from a network share (a UNC share or a mapped drive) and that is located on a Windows 2000 server, you may receive the following error message:
Cannot delete File name: It is being used by another person or program.

Close any programs that might be using the file and try again.

Or

Windows Explorer may stop responding for about 30 seconds, and then you may receive the following error message:

Cannot delete File name: It is being used by another person or program.

Close any programs that might be using the file and try again.
"The specified network password is not correct" error message when you try to access Windows 98 shared folders from a Windows XP Service Pack 1-based computer

After you update your Microsoft Windows XP SP1-based computer, you cannot access shared folders that are on Microsoft Windows 98-based computers and that are protected with a password. When you try to access the shared folders, you receive the following error message:

The specified network password is not correct.
Error message when you use a Windows XP-based computer to share files over a network: "Error: Server service not started"

When you use a Microsoft Windows XP-based computer to share files with another user over a network, you receive the following error message:

Error: Server service not started

Additionally, when you try to start the Server service, the service does not start. Instead, you receive the following error message:

Error 126: The specified module cannot be found
Unusable results when you search a network location in Windows Server 2003 and in Windows XP

When you search a network location in Microsoft Windows Server 2003 and in Microsoft Windows XP, the search results may be unusable. For example, you may receive unusable search results that are similar to the following:

Name:                   In Folder   Size   Type
2000 on 'appsnode1'(Z:) My Computer Network Drive
2000 on 'appsnode1'(Z:) My Computer Network Drive
2000 on 'appsnode1'(Z:) My Computer Network Drive
2000 on 'appsnode1'(Z:) My Computer Network Drive
2000 on 'appsnode1'(Z:) My Computer Network Drive

Cannot Use a Windows XP Network Share if You Are a Member of More Than 180 Groups

Under the following conditions, you may receive one of two different error messages:
  • You try to use a share on a Windows XP-based computer from another client computer.
  • Your domain account is a member of more than 180 groups.
  • You try to connect to the share by using a universal naming convention (UNC) name such as \\computer name\share name.
Under these conditions, you may receive either of the following error messages:

Windows cannot find \\computer name
computer name is not accessible [...] you might not have permissions to access computer name. More data is available.

On a Windows XP Service Pack 2-based computer, you cannot access the correct DFS share after information about the link target is updated

Consider the following scenario:
  • In a network environment, you deploy a cascaded Distributed File System (DFS) design.
  • You configure DFS links that point to network shares.
  • You update the network shares to which the DFS links point.
In this scenario, a Windows XP Service Pack 2 (SP2)-based DFS client computer does not obtain the updated information about the link target from the DFS root. Therefore, you cannot access the correct network share.

In this scenario, you must restart the client computer to update the information about the DFS link target.
A computer may use the Offline Files feature to access a shared network resource even though the network connection has sufficient speed in Windows XP

In Microsoft Windows XP, a computer may use the Offline Files feature to access a shared network resource even though the network connection has sufficient speed.
When you try to connect to a DSF root shared folder from a client computer that is running Windows XP, the client computer cannot recognize a DFS link

Consider the following scenario:
  • On a Microsoft Windows XP-based client computer, you map a drive to a shared folder on a server.
  • You configure the mapped drive to use the Reconnect at logon option.
  • You delete the shared folder on the server.
  • You create a stand-alone Distributed File System (DFS) root on the server. The DFS root has the same name as the shared folder that you delete.
  • You map the drive to the DFS root on the client computer.
  • You create a DFS link in the DFS root.
In this scenario, when you try to connect to the DSF root, the client computer cannot recognize the DFS link. Additionally, the DFS tab is missing from the Properties dialog box of the DSF root shared folder.
Error message after you try to access a mapped network drive when you work offline on a Windows XP-based computer: "Drive_Letter:\ is not accessible"

Consider the following scenario:
  • On a Windows XP-based client computer, you map a network drive from a Distributed File System (DFS) network share.
  • You make the network drive available offline.
  • You log back on to the computer by using cached credentials, and then you work offline.

When you try to access the mapped network drive in this scenario, you receive the following error message:

Drive_Letter:\ is not accessible - Configuration information could not be read from the domain controller, either because the entire machine is unavailable, or access has been denied.

Note: When you receive this error message, you can view the properties of the network drive. After you do this, you can successfully access the network drive.
Error message when you try to connect to a network resource in Windows XP: "Windows cannot find the network path"

In Microsoft Windows XP, when you try to connect to a network resource, the connection may time out. Additionally, you receive an error message that resembles the following:

Windows cannot find the network path. Verify that the network path is correct and the destination computer is not busy or turned off. If Windows still cannot find the network path, contact your network administrator.

For example, this problem may occur when you try to connect to a shared resource by using the server message block (SMB) protocol.
How to re-initialize the offline files cache and database

The Offline Files (CSC or Client Side Caching) cache and database has a built-in capability to restart if its contents are suspected of being corrupted. If corruption is suspected, the Synchronization Wizard may return the following error message:

Unable to merge offline changes on \\server_name\share_name. The parameter is incorrect.
The "Encrypt the Offline Files cache" Group Policy setting does not take effect when a user logs on to a Windows XP-based computer

After the network administrator applies the Encrypt the Offline Files cache (EncryptCache) Group Policy setting to a Microsoft Windows XP Professional-based computer, the Group Policy setting does not take effect on the client computer. This symptom occurs only if the user logs on interactively by using the keyboard.
"Errors occurred while Windows was synchronizing your data" error message appears when you try to synchronizing offline files

After you have worked with Offline Files and have added lots of data or after you have set up a Folder Redirection (for example, a redirected My Documents folder), you may receive the following error message during the subsequent synchronization process:

Window Title: Synchronization Complete
Errors occurred while Windows was synchronizing your data.

The following error message may appear on the Results tab:

Offline Files ('\\server\share' on server):
Unable to connect to '\\server\share.'
The specified network name is no longer available.


The following text may appear on the Progress tab:

\\server\share on server Failed

The Offline File Status window displays the following message:

You are working online on 'server', but changes you made offline have not been synchronized.
Client side caching does not synchronize the offline files and folders in Windows XP if you restart the computer

If you restart the computer, client side caching does not synchronize the offline files and folders.
Warnings During Synchronization of Offline Files

When you are using a group policy object to administratively assign offline files and configure the policy to exclude certain files, Windows XP clients may receive the following warning message during synchronization:

Warnings occurred while Windows was synchronizing your data.
Results: Offline files.
Unable to make file name available offline. Files of this type cannot be made available offline.


The files listed are those that have one of the file extensions that is specified in the exclusion list of your offline files policy. However, despite the warnings, the synchronization completes.
You may not be able to synchronize offline files as you expect in Windows XP

You may not be able to synchronize offline files as you expect in Microsoft Windows XP. When this problem occurs, you may receive one of the following error messages.

Error message 1
More data is available.

Error message 2
The system cannot find the file specified.

You cannot resolve the problem by restarting the computer.
Files that you add to the Offline Files folder on a Windows XP-based computer are synchronized when another person uses the computer

If you add files to the Offline Files folder on a Microsoft Windows XP-based computer that is shared by more than one user, offline synchronization of those files will occur when another user logs on to that computer. Network shares and Web sites that require your security credentials cannot synchronize and will prompt other users to submit the correct credentials.
You cannot clear or select the "Ask me before synchronizing the items" check box for Offline Files on Windows XP or on Windows 2000

When you try to change the Ask me before synchronizing the items setting for Offline Files, you may not be able to clear or to select this check box. Additionally, if you have the Group Policy setting Synchronize all offline items before logging off turned on, the Ask me before synchronizing the items check box may be cleared when you view the Synchronization Settings dialog box for an offline folder. This behaviour occurs when you use an administrator account to log on to a computer that is running Microsoft Windows XP or Microsoft Windows 2000.
The value for the "Amount of disk space to use for temporary offline files" option reverts after you make it larger than 2 GB in Windows XP and in Windows 2000 Professional

In Microsoft Windows Explorer, in the Folder Options dialog box, you set the value for Amount of disk space to use for temporary offline files option so that the value is larger than 2 gigabytes (GB). After you make this change, you open the Folder Options dialog box again. You notice that the value for the setting has reverted to the previous value.
Configure Slow Link Speed Group Policy does not force offline files to offline mode when a slow link is detected

When you use the Configure Slow Link Speed Group Policy, a network connection speed that is slower than the threshold that is specified does not force Offline Files to Offline Mode. As a result, redirected folders are still accessed over the network instead of the local offline copy being used.
Only the Offline Files Are Displayed When You Use a Remote Access or Virtual Private Network Connection

When you connect to a network by using either a remote access or virtual private network (VPN) connection, you can browse the network and you can ping servers and receive a reply, but if you try to view the shared resources on a server, you can observe only the files that have been made available offline.

Also, the icon in the bottom right corner of the screen indicates that you are offline.

If you disable offline caching on the client computer, and then connect by means of either a remote access or VPN connection, all the files are visible.
You may receive error messages when you synchronize Offline Files on a Windows XP-based computer

You may receive the following error messages when you synchronize Offline Files on a Microsoft Windows XP-based computer:

Offline files \\Server\\Share Error accessing '.' on
\\Server\Share\Drive
Letter: Files of this type can
not be made available offline.Offline files \\Server\\Share Error
accessing 'Subfolder' on \\Server\Share\Drive
Letter:\.\TopFolder. The path is invalid.

Offline Files Automatically Switch to Offline Mode After You Use the Csccmd /disconnect Command

When you use the Csccmd /disconnect command-line option to manually force offline files into offline mode, the offline files may switch to online mode after about 10 minutes.
Administratively Assigned Offline Files Remain Available Offline After Being Moved to Another Folder

When you drag files or folders from an administratively assigned offline folder to a folder that is not assigned for offline file storage, the files or folders remain available offline. The Make Available Offline command on the file system object's shortcut menu is selected (checked) and unavailable (dimmed). This problem occurs with Windows XP Professional, Windows 2000 Service Pack 3 (SP3), and any version of Windows 2000 if the hotfix that is described in Microsoft Knowledge Base article 296068 has been applied.
New drive or mapped network drive not available in Windows Explorer

When you:
  • create a new volume on a local disk.
  • plug in a removable disk with existing volumes.
  • plug in a removable drive (for example, a USB floppy drive or PCMCIA flash card).
  • add a physical hard disk or CD-ROM drive to your computer.
  • use Offline Files and specify items to be synchronized when you log on.
You may experience any of the following symptoms:
  • An existing mapped network drive is no longer available in Windows Explorer.
  • The new drive is not available in Windows Explorer.
  • The new drive appears in Windows Explorer, but when you open it the contents of the existing drive are displayed.
  • The existing drive appears in Windows Explorer, but when you open it the contents of the new drive are displayed.
  • After your computer starts, the network drive may be replaced by the new drive.
  • After you disconnect the new drive, the mapped network drive letter has the same logical drive letter that it had before you added the new drive.
  • You may receive the following error message when you start your computer:
    • The local device name is already in use.
You cannot open a mapped offline-files drive during CSC synchronization in Windows XP

When you try to open a mapped offline-files drive by using Windows Explorer during client side caching (CSC) synchronization of offline files, you may receive the following error message:

My Computer
Drive_letter:\ refers to a location that is unavailable. It could be on a hard drive on this computer, or on a network. Check to make sure that the disk is properly inserted, or that you are connected to the Internet or your network, and then try again. If it still cannot be located, the information might have been moved to a different location.


You cannot remove the mapped drive, and if you try to disconnect the network connection that the mapped drive uses to connect to the network share, you receive the following error message:

The network connection could not be found.
You receive a "Reached the end of the file" or "More Data is available" error message when you log off

When you log off a computer that is running Microsoft Windows XP Professional, you may receive one of the following error messages:

Offline Files: Error accessing Share name on \\Computer name\path to share. Reached the end of the file.

Offline Files: Error accessing Share name on \\Computer name\path to share. More Data is available.

Subfolders Are Always Available Offline

If you are using Offline Files, you cannot choose to synchronize only the current folder but not the subfolders (this corresponds to the No, make only this folder available offline option in the Confirm Offline Subfolders dialog box) if you have redirected your My Documents folder to a network location. No matter which option you use, the subfolders are made available offline.
Windows XP stops responding when it tries to access an offline folder on a DFS share point

Microsoft Windows XP may appear to stop responding (hang) when it tries to access files in an offline folder that is mounted on a Distributed file system (DFS) share point.
How To Use the Fast User Switching Feature in Windows XP

Fast User Switching cannot be used when Offline Files are enabled. When you attempt to enable Fast User Switching, you may receive the following error message when you click Change the way users log on or off:

Fast User Switching cannot be used because Offline Files is currently enabled. To make changes to Offline Files, click OK.
You Are Prompted to Use a Dial-Up Connection When You Try to Use a Network Connection

When you try to connect to the Internet through your network connection, you are prompted to use a dial-up connection instead.

This problem occurs after you have synchronized offline files in Microsoft Internet Explorer. When you do so, the Always dial my default connection option on the Connection tab of the Internet properties is automatically turned on and the Never dial a connection option is turned off.
How To Synchronize Mobile Devices and Desktop Computers with Synchronization Manager

This step-by-step article describes how to synchronize mobile devices and desktop computers with Synchronization Manager.

Users of mobile devices such as laptop and notebook computers often need to synchronize their mobile devices with desktop computers. The Windows XP Synchronization Manager helps ensure that the files and folders on your mobile device and your desktop computer stay synchronized. With Synchronization Manager, you can be sure you are always working with the latest copy of your data, online or offline.

Synchronization Manager enables you to control when your offline files are synchronized with files on the network.
Domain DFS network path goes offline after you open Windows Explorer or My Computer in Windows XP

When you successfully synchronize your offline items and then open My Computer or Windows Explorer on a Microsoft Windows XP-based computer, you may receive the following message:

You are no longer connected to "Server_Name".
You can continue working normally.


Your domain Distributed File System (DFS) network path goes offline, and you cannot connect to your server.
Long delay before you can connect to a domain-based DFS namespace

After you reconnect to a network, you may not be able to open a domain-based Distributed File System (DFS) link or a domain-based DFS root for up to 15 minutes. Therefore, you may experience problems when your computer first tries to synchronize offline files to a DFS root or to a DFS link.
Windows Explorer does not display icons for .htm files, for .html files, or for .msg files after you enable offline files in Windows XP or in Windows Server 2003

After you enable offline files, Windows Explorer does not display icons for the following files:
  • .msg files
  • .htm files
  •  .html files
Unnecessary offline file synchronization may cause "Access denied" error messages

If multiple users use the same computer and have their home folders and My Documents folders redirected to a network share, a user may receive an "Access denied" error message when the user logs on or off (depending on the Automatically synchronize the selected items setting).
One or more programs appear to be uninstalled when you start Windows XP Professional

When you start Microsoft Windows XP Professional, one or more programs appear to be uninstalled. However, when you restart your computer, the program or programs appear to be reinstalled. This problem occurs when Group Policy assigns the programs that are uninstalled and then reinstalled.

This problem does not occur consistently.
This problem occurs if the following conditions are true:
  • Offline Files are configured for a Distributed File System (DFS) path that resembles the following:
    • Your_Domain\Share_Name
  • The Offline Files feature determines that a shared folder that has a path that starts with Your_Domain is unavailable.
Windows XP stops responding when you try to save a large offline file

Consider the following scenario. You use the Offline Files feature in Microsoft Windows XP to make a file available to you offline. The file is located in a shared folder. The file is large. You work with the file when you are offline. However, if you try to save the file when you are offline, Windows XP stops responding. For example, you experience this problem when you try to save a Microsoft Excel workbook that is larger than 20 megabytes.
A manually pinned file may be unavailable when you disconnect from a network in XP

Consider the following scenario:
  • A file is created or edited in a folder that is not available offline in Microsoft Windows XP.
  • One of the subfolders of this folder is available offline.
  • The file has entered the temporary cache.
  • After the file exits the temporary cache, the file is manually pinned.
In this scenario, when you right-click the file, and then you click Make Available Offline, the file may be unavailable when you disconnect from the network. This behaviour occurs even though the synchronization process seems to complete without an error. If you later connect to the network, and then you resynchronize files, the file may become available offline.
 All files are unexpectedly removed from the local My Documents folder when you log on to a Windows XP-based computer

When you connect the Windows XP-based computer to a network and log on to a Windows XP-based computer, all files are unexpectedly removed from the local My Documents folder. These files are not restored until you synchronize the local My Documents folder.

You notice this problem if the following conditions are true:
  • The Policy Maker snap-in is installed on the computer.
  • The My Documents folder is redirected to a shared folder by using the folder redirection feature.
  • The Offline files option is enabled for the My Documents folder.
  • The computer is working in offline mode.